Curriculum

Search our classes

NH Civics is pleased to share with you a library of civics curricula created by NH teachers between 2015 and 2019 and inspired by a NH Civics teacher professional development opportunity. See below the various topics around which we have organized the curricula; you can search by topic, keyword, or grade level. These curricular resources were edited by NH Civics Trustees, graduate students and a professor from Plymouth State College, and a high school civics teacher. We hope these teacher-created resources are helpful, relevant, and that they make increased quality and quantity of civics instruction in NH possible. We aim to add to this library over time.



Sorry, we did not find any results for your search.

Classes for Fourth Grade

  • Becoming President - Virtual

    In this lesson, students learn the complexities of the election process, with a focus on the electoral college and its effect on the campaign process. Students play "Win the White House" from iCivics after an introduction to the electoral college. Explain the electoral process (primary and general elections, Electoral College). Identify the influence of the media in forming public opinion Analyze how parts of a whole interact to produce outcomes in complex systems,

  • Bill of Rights for Elementary School Students

    Students will explore the text of the Bill of Rights, identify the meaning of the first ten Amendments, and make connections among the amendments to their own lives.

  • Branches of Government

    Students will be able to identify the three branches of government as evidenced by their performance on the Three Branches of Government exit ticket.

  • Civics Songs

    Use songs to teach American government, history, patriotism, and culture.

  • Click, Clack, Moo, Cows that Type

    After reading the book, Click, Clack, Moo, Cows that Type, students will be able to use at least one example from the book to participate in a class discussion before completely filling out the worksheets, “The Farm Community,” and “Community/ Authority.”

  • Click, Clack, Moo, Cows that Type - Virtual

    After reading the book, Click, Clack, Moo, Cows that Type, students will be able to use at least one example from the book to participate in a class discussion before completely filling out the worksheets, “The Farm Community,” and “Community/ Authority.”

  • Debate Simulation

    Students will simulate the debate process and will complete the Debate Script sheet and/ or they will participate in an actual in-class debate or will ask at least two questions to their classmates who are debating.

  • Journey to the White House

    Students will explain the different between the general election and the electoral college.  Students will describe the election process.

  • Law Through Branches

    Students will know the steps a bill takes before becoming law, the role of the legislative and executive branch members in the law making process, and the tole of the judicial branch in ruling a law constitutional or not.  Students will be able to define a bill, veto and law.

  • My Patriotic Class

    Students will have a good understanding of their local government.

  • New Hampshire Court Curriculum

    The future of democracy depends on young learners developing into responsible, educated citizens who understand and respect our justice system.  The sad reality is that currently, many, if not most, early impressions about the justice system come from television and the mass media or from family members. These impressions are often inaccurate or unfavorable. The key to changing these inaccurate impressions is early education. This curriculum addresses these issues.

  • Preamble to the Constitution - Virtual

    Students will be familiar with the purpose of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution. 

    Students will be able to explain some key phrases and define key vocabulary as evidenced by their responses on the exit ticket.

  • Qualifications for Becoming President - Virtual

    Students will be able to list the three main Constitutional qualifications for becoming president of the United States as evidenced by accurately completing the comic strip assignment.

  • Respectful Disagreeing

    Students will reflect on, “E is for Election Day,” and Kid President video and will discuss and brainstorm ways to debate, while creating at least one original piece of debate advice to share with the class. Students will create a list of beliefs and values and will practice forming a debate on a particular value or belief, by filling out the Debate Script handout.

  • Respectful Disagreeing - Virtual

    Students will learn strategies on how to respectfully disagree.  Using given templates, students will choose a given topic and create both pro and con arguments for that topic.

  • Rules and Laws

    Students will be able to indicate the difference between a “rule” and a “law” and provide one example for each as evidenced by completion of the exit ticket.

  • Rules and Laws - Virtual

    Students will be able to indicate the difference between a “rule” and a “law” and provide one example for each as evidenced by completion of the exit ticket.

  • The Constitution - Virtual

    By the end of the lesson, students will define the many different parts of our Constitution as evidenced by their completion of the exit slip.

  • The Constitution of the United States - Virtual

    By the end of the lesson, students will define the many different parts of our Constitution as evidenced by their poster presentation/rubric; showcasing the definitions and meanings and significance of their particular section.

  • The First Ten Amendments - Virtual

    Students will be able to demonstrate understanding and communicate the meanings of the 10 Amendments of the Bill of Rights. They will be able to identify the rights that mean the most to them. They will be able to connect the relevance of the amendments in connection with their own lives.

  • Three Branches of Government - Virtual

    Students will be able to identify the Three Branches of Government.

  • Win the White House

    In this lesson, students learn the complexities of the election process, with a focus on the electoral college and its effect on the campaign process. Students play "Win the White House" from iCivics after an introduction to the electoral college.

  • Worldwide Government

    Following a lesson about governments around the world, students will label at least ten countries and four types of government on a world map.

  • Your Vote is Your Voice

    The word democracy describes a government by the people, in which citizens exercise their power by voting. In our democracy, citizens have rights that include being able to express our opinions, receive a free education, and practice any religion we choose. U.S. citizens won and protected these rights through voting. Having the right to vote is part of living in a democracy. And exercising that right is a way for citizens to take responsibility for - and take part in - their government.

  • Ten Amendments of the Bill of Rights

    Students will be able to demonstrate and communicate the meanings of the ten Amendments of the Bill of Rights by translating them and distributing them on handouts to the class. Following a review of the ten Amendments of the Bill of Rights, students will write a paragraph for each Amendment and explain how it affects their life, using a topic sentence, three supporting details and a concluding sentence.

  • The Constitution

    By the end of the lesson, students will define the many different parts of our Constitution as evidenced by their poster presentation/rubric; showcasing the definitions and meanings and significance of their particular section.

Quote
All aspects of the institute were wonderful.
- Teacher
Looking for More Info?

Please contact us with any questions you may have about any of our programs or would like additional information.

Enews Sign-Up