Privacy and the Fourth Amendment - Virtual

Editor: Corey Genest

General Description

Goals:
Students will be able to analyze how the constitutional right of privacy and the definition of search and seizure have evolved over time.

Students will understand that:
  • The U.S. Supreme Court is the supreme authority over the meaning of the U.S. Constitution and can change its interpretation of the Constitution over time.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court has recognized the right of privacy as an implicit right contained within the Bill of Rights.
  • While a general right of privacy has been recognized since colonial times, the meaning of the right of privacy has changed over time.
  • Technological advancements have caused the Supreme Court to reevaluate the meaning of a search under the Fourth Amendment.
  • Changing interpretations of the Constitution allow it to keep up with the times.

Essential Questions:
  • Why is the Supreme Court permitted to change its interpretation of the U.S. Constitution?
  • What is the difference between an explicit and an implicit legal right?
  • How and why has the meaning of the right of privacy changed over time?
  • Why has the Supreme Court periodically reevaluated the meaning of a search under the Fourth Amendment?
  • How does the Constitution keep up with the times?

Students will know:
  • Important terms regarding the right of privacy and searches under the Fourth Amendment.
  • Key facts about the changing interpretation of the right of privacy and more specifically the Fourth Amendment.
  • Key Supreme Court cases on the right of privacy and more specifically on the Fourth Amendment.

Students will be able to:
  • Recognize, define, and use right of privacy and Fourth Amendment vocabulary in context.
  • Research Supreme Court cases and recent news on the right of privacy and the Fourth Amendment to add depth to their understanding of its development over time.
  • Express their learning orally during class discussions and in writing.
  • Collaborate successfully with their peers to improve and express their learning.

Learning Activities:

In these activities students will explore the meaning of privacy and the development of the constitutional right of privacy over time.

Materials and Documents

Quote
I am very excited to use 'We the Civics Kids" curriculum and use many ideas from the Rendell Center. My other favorite presentation was Rebecca Valbuena - so many of her ideas are related to what I can implement in my classroom.
- Teacher
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